michael chiklis
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Toshiba USB to SATA Guide

Thu Oct 19, 2017 5:19 am

I don't think they're too short, problem could be elsowhere.
Can you show us your soldering job with a pic?

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pclab
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Toshiba USB to SATA Guide

Thu Oct 19, 2017 5:20 am

Here is a photo of it.
Never mind the cut wires of terminal (I didn't wanted to unsolder them ehhehehe)
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IMG_20171019_101837.jpg
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michael chiklis
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Toshiba USB to SATA Guide

Sat Oct 21, 2017 6:34 pm

Yes, they're too long wires.
When i soldered wires to convert usb to sata, they were much more short but drive was still very unstable.

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pclab
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Toshiba USB to SATA Guide

Mon Oct 23, 2017 3:54 am

A PCB was already ordered. Client will have to wait...
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SilverPuppy
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Toshiba USB to SATA Guide

Mon Oct 23, 2017 4:38 pm

michael chiklis wrote:Unfortunately there isn't a way to write rom on donor sata pcb via serial mode, but i'll explain you how to write it without taking off chip from donor pcb by using eprom programmer.
This task is hard, you'll need good soldering skills with classic soldering iron, steady hand, good magnifying glass and time, but at least you can do it without unsoldering rom chip from sata pcb.
Need to solder 6 thin wires, or just 5 wires due to fact that it will not be necessary to apply on rom Vcc power with your eprom programmer, just power on sata pcb by using computer sata cables to easily supply Vcc on rom chip.

wp_20171012_18_14_26_pro.jpg
wp_20171012_18_15_22_pro.jpg
wp_20171012_16_41_59_pro.jpg
wp_20171012_16_39_15_pro.jpg
wp_20171012_17_19_50_pro.jpg


Vcc is ROM pin 8, pin 3 and 7 are natively jointed together on board to pin 8.
This means that pins 3 - 7 - 8 are in common.


You're a hero. You didn't specify where to put the vcc wire though, so I'll have to figure it out. (Although if 3, 7, and 8 are joined at the board why would that be needed?) Water-damaged board won't power up. I'm hoping to read the water-damaged one this way and maybe even write it to the new board this way, as with my current toolset that would probably be easier (and definitely be safer) than removing the chip.

Any reason a CH341A based programmer couldn't handle this task?

jol
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Toshiba USB to SATA Guide

Mon Oct 23, 2017 7:39 pm

@SilverPuppy try an ultrasonic clean
it can do magic in case like yours

michael chiklis
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Toshiba USB to SATA Guide

Mon Oct 23, 2017 7:51 pm

SilverPuppy wrote:Source of the post You're a hero. You didn't specify where to put the vcc wire though, so I'll have to figure it out. (Although if 3, 7, and 8 are joined at the board why would that be needed?)


Have you read carefully my post?
posting.php?mode=edit&f=29&p=8871

Have you seen carefully my pics?
wp_20171012_16_41_59_pro (1).jpg

wp_20171012_16_39_15_pro (1).jpg


If you know the basics of electronics, you should know that you can choose where to solder the Vcc wire (pin 8 or pin 7 or pin 3).
I choosed to solder wire on pin 3 (there is a reason why i've coloured pin 3 - 7 - 8 in yellow colour).

Regarding Vcc line (yellow points), you neither need any of those if you use usb power supply.
Of course, reading/writing rom on board will work only if there isn't any short circuit on Vcc power line, if your pcb has short circuit you should consider to physically transfer rom (seek a pro).

SilverPuppy wrote:Source of the post Any reason a CH341A based programmer couldn't handle this task?

You should first check ROM datasheet to insure at what voltage does it work.
Typical rom that you can find on these toshiba pcb is 25P40V6 which needs power supply between 2.7V - 3.6V
25P40V6 power supply.jpg

then find out if your eprom programmer provides proper power supply to rom, if is higher (example 5V) then definitely you shouldn't use on your rom because it can kill it.

Besides power supply, you eprom should support SPI 25 series roms

SilverPuppy
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Toshiba USB to SATA Guide

Mon Oct 23, 2017 9:48 pm

Thanks for the help everyone. Sorry for appearing to have not paid attention to your diagrams and such; I was a little confused, basically because I've been sick and apparently forgotten how to count. :roll: My boards are USB and as such some of the solder points are in a little different place than they are on your SATA board, but they're pretty obvious because the traces are clearly visible.

I don't have access to an ultrasonic cleaner at the moment, but agree that it would be an excellent strategy if I did. I'm going to see if I can clone the ROM from the old to the new without removing them from the board. I will post the result for sure.

michael chiklis
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Toshiba USB to SATA Guide

Tue Oct 24, 2017 3:01 am

Remember, use only your usb power supply, if that doesn't work then give power to rom by using eprom programmer.
Do not use both together!

SilverPuppy
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Toshiba USB to SATA Guide

Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:25 am

Success! Long and winding road that I'm sure my client wished would have taken less time.

First I tried to recover the contents of IC602 using ICSP with a moderately-priced 866A USB programmer only to discover it didn't support ICSP on SPI25 chips. After feeling totally betrayed that an ICSP programmer wouldn't support it on probably THE MOST common micro flash chip of them all, I ordered a very cheap CH341A and attempted ICSP with that. After revising the design of the programmer so the voltages were correct, I was able to confirm that the chip had data on it, but not read it reliably, much less write anything. Having the USB power on made no difference.

Long and short of it, after trying desperately to avoid using hot air on those chips because of the remote possibility of cooking the damaged board's chip and losing the data forever, I ended up using hot air, not cooking the chip, transferring it over, and the drive boots up and runs as designed. I did use the CH341A solder-only chip adapter board as a layover on the flight to the undamaged PCB, since the long solder pads on the adapter make the chip reattach at a much lower temperature than the actual drive PCB, so I figured I'd drop it in the reader and take a backup of it first. Having done that and knowing that I could now burn a replacement on the IC602 from the donor board, I soldered the data chip in the donor board and put it back together. The original drive is alive with its original IC602 on its replacement PCB and IS backed up now.

Thanks for all the help. I really appreciate it. The forum calls me a noob, which I'm definitely not, but having been out of data recovery for awhile, the world has definitely changed somewhat, and you helped me get back up to speed. Merry Christmas, a happy new year, and we'll meet again.

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